Tease

kissing children

In high school a girl who kissed and kissed and kissed and never went any further, was a tease.  And we all know what kind of tease. 

But, in a way, that label is a good example of our tendency to ignore the perfectly wonderful experiences life gives us in order to push and strive and slide our way to some new experience we’re promised will be even better, more wonderful than what we’re doing right now, this moment.

Looking back, those kisses were pretty darn good.  In lots of ways they were more memorable than what came later.  Sex is sex.  But a kiss, ah a kiss holds promise and innocence and hope.

As a child, I craved to be a teenager.  Single, I thought marriage would be better.  Married, children seemed the thing.  When three young sons ruled my life, I was sure life would be easier, more full, when the boys were older. Now, of course, I look back on all those times fondly, nostalgically, with great yearning.

I wonder how much of life I miss even now, by always keeping my eye on the next and the next and the next goal. 

Life is a tease.  About darn time I enjoyed it.

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About Author and Speaker Pamela Foster

Pamela Foster is a speaker and author. Her first book, Redneck Goddess, is available at local bookstores and on Amazon. Her second book, Bigfoot Blues, will be available in August 2012.
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7 Responses to Tease

  1. Hope you don’t mind, but I tweeted the line “Sex is sex…” Great line!

  2. Living in the now – not allowing ourselves to be teased along to the next thing – takes constant practice. I’m better at it, but shiny things can still distract me. Lovely post. 🙂

  3. Eric says:

    You have a great writing style and a wonderful view of the world. I believe I shall follow You! 😉

    If I was a cowboy I’d say that the “grass” is always greener on the other side of the saddle. But since I am a Connecticut Yankee, I will say that living is a bit like this: Life is like the Declaration of Independence.

    Most people glance at the Declaration of Independence. Then they immediately turn and shuffle along with the rest of the crowd on that dirty sidewalk.

    A lot of people pick the Declaration up and read it, loving its brevity, its texture of history and its artistic expression. Then they remember that their hair appointment is in ten minutes and promptly focus on their next mundane goal. By the time the shampoo is running down that deep, dark black sink they have entirely forgotten its message.

    Some people ponder over the Declaration of Independence. For an entire lifetime. They analyze every letter, phrase and punctuation mark (there’s a reason why “analyze” starts with those first four letters). In the end, they die knowing the meaning but never bringing themselves to do the pursuing part of it.

    But a precious few live the Declaration of Independence. Life is the great race, the pursuit after the intangible, improbable and downright impossible. It’s not the side of the saddle that’s important. It’s that beautiful ride. And the other persons sharing it with you.

    So whether we catch it or not, we must pursue. Or the Declaration of Independence is simply a tattered old piece of paper in a pressure sealed glass case that is protected, honored and even venerated. But never used, never pursued.

    Eric

  4. Eric says:

    Reblogged this on Eric M. Vogt: Life-Writings and commented:
    I was commenting on a friend’s blog and realized that I was writing my own blog entry. So here it is:

    If I was a cowboy I’d say that the “grass” is always greener on the other side of the saddle. But since I am a Connecticut Yankee, I will say that living is a bit like this: Life is like the Declaration of Independence.

    Most people glance at the Declaration of Independence. Then they immediately turn and shuffle along with the rest of the crowd on that dirty sidewalk to nowhere.

    A lot of people pick the Declaration up and read it, loving its brevity, its texture of history and its artistic expression. Then they remember that their hair appointment is in ten minutes and promptly focus on their next mundane goal. By the time the shampoo is running down that deep, dark black sink they have entirely forgotten its message.

    Some people ponder over the Declaration of Independence. For an entire lifetime. They analyze every letter, phrase and punctuation mark (there’s a reason why “analyze” starts with those first four letters). In the end, they die knowing the meaning but never quite bringing themselves to do the pursuing part of it.

    But a precious few live the Declaration of Independence. Life is the great race, the pursuit after the intangible, improbable and downright impossible. It’s not the side of the saddle that’s important. It’s that beautiful ride. And the other persons sharing it with you.

    So whether we catch it or not, we must pursue. Or the Declaration of Independence is simply a tattered old piece of paper in a pressure sealed glass case that is protected, honored and even venerated. But never practically used, never pursued.

    Eric M. Vogt, Copyright 2013

  5. joedalio says:

    I love this message! I think we are all guilty of looking ahead to the next step. I’ve learned that, the more we cherish the present blessings, the more the future ones take care of themselves : )

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